Livestock Nutrition Research Program

Dr. Travis Whitney, Project Leader

RESEARCH FOCUS:

Dr. Whitney’s applied Ruminant Livestock Nutrition Research Program is a component of a holistic approach to “Ranching Solutions,” which is the core objective of the Texas A&M AgriLife Research and Extension Center, located in San Angelo, TX. This interdisciplinary program is directed towards helping the livestock industry make more informed and effective management decisions related to livestock production. The primary objective is to reduce costs associated with feeding livestock by: 1) increasing livestock production efficiency; 2) increasing the value of underutilized feed sources such as dried distillers grains and ground woody products such as juniper and mesquite trees; and 3) using plant secondary compounds to enhance ruminal microbial efficiency, bypass protein, and animal health (e.g., reduce internal parasites). Secondary objectives are to enhance animal fiber, carcass, meat, and milk characteristics.

 

MOST RECENT PEER-REVIEWED ARTICLES: (* denotes graduate student)

Published:

  • Whitney, T. R. 2017. Ground Juniperus pinchotii and urea in supplements fed to Rambouillet ewe lambs: I. Feedlot growth traits, blood serum parameters, and fecal characteristics. J. Anim. Sci. 95:3676−3686. doi: 10.2527/jas2017.1419
  • Whitney, T. R., J. L. Glasscock, J. P. Muir, W. C. Stewart, and E. J. Scholljegerdes. 2017. Substituting ground woody plants for cottonseed hulls in lamb feedlot diets: growth performance, blood serum chemistry, and rumen fluid parameters. J. Anim. Sci. 95:1−14. doi: 10.2527/jas2017.1649
  • *Stewart, W. C., Whitney, T. R., E. J. Scholljegerdes, D. M. Hallford, J. W. Walker, R. P. Adams, and H. D. Naumann. 2017. Effects of feeding ground redberry juniper (Juniperus pinchotii) to gestating ewes on pre- and postpartum performance, serum metabolites and hormones, milk fatty acid composition and progeny preweaning performance. J. Anim. Sci. 95:4113−4123. doi: 10.2527/jas2016.1090
  • Ishaq, L., C. J. Yeoman, and T. R. Whitney. 2017. Ground Juniperus pinchotii and urea in supplements fed to Rambouillet ewe lambs. Part 2: Ewe lamb rumen microbial communities. J. Anim. Sci. doi: 10.2527/jas2017.1731
  • Kerth, C. R., K. R. Wall, S. B. Smith, T. R. Whitney, J. L. Glasscock, and J. T. Sawyer. 2018. Substituting ground woody plants for cottonseed hulls in lamb feedlot diets: Carcass characteristics, adipose tissue fatty acid composition, and sensory panel traits. J. Anim. Sci. 96:487−497  doi: 10.1093/jas/sky024
  • *Glasscock, J. L., T. R. Whitney, J. R. Roper, A. R. Holmes, S. G. Marrs, W. C. Stewart, and E. J. Scholljegerdes. 2018. Substituting ground woody plants for cottonseed hulls in goat feedlot diets: growth performance and blood serum chemistry. J. Anim. Sci. doi 10.1093/jas/sky159
  • Naumann, H. D., W. C. Stewart, and T. R. Whitney. The effect of maturity on concentration and biological activity of protein precipitable polyphenols in ground juniper is dependent upon species. Anim. Feed Sci. Technol. 246:11−17. doi: 10.1016/j.anifeedsci.2018.09.013
  • McCord, S.A., D. R. Stevens, and T. R. Whitney. Chapter 4: Sustainable sheep and goat production through strategic nutritional management and advanced technologies. in: F. W. Bazer, G. C. Lamb, and G. Wu (eds.), Animal Agriculture: Challenges, Innovations, and Sustainability. In Press
  • Whitney T. R. and J. T. Sawyer, L. O. Tedeschi, and E. A. Colombo. 2018. Substituting ground Juniperus spp. for ground alfalfa hay in steer feedlot diets: growth performance and blood serum chemistry.  In Press
  • *Stewart, W. C., T. R. Whitney, E. J. Scholljegerdes, J. W. Walker, and R. P. Adams. Ruminal fermentation characteristics of goats selectively bred to have greater consumption of juniper foliage. In Press
  • *Glasscock, J. L., T. R. Whitney, D. G. Hewitt, and S. M. Cooper. 2018. Use of ground juniper to reduce feral hog consumption. Under Review
  • Kerth, C., T. W. Murphy, W. C. Stewart, T. R. Whitney, J. Boles, and R. Miller. Sire breed, harvest age, and diet effects on the flavor profile and consumer acceptance of American lamb. Under Review

 Under Construction:

  • Whitney T. R. Substituting dried distillers grains for cottonseed meal and sorghum grain in lamb feedlot diets: growth, blood serum, wool, carcass, adipose tissue fatty acid composition, and sensory panel traits.
  • *Hodges, T. R. Whitney, and S. Ramsey. Replacing cottonseed meal and sorghum grain with corn dried distillers grains with solubles in lamb feedlot diets: growth performance, blood serum chemistry, and rumen fluid parameters.
  • *Hodges, C. R. Kerth, T. R. Whitney, and S. Ramsey. Replacing cottonseed meal and sorghum grain with corn dried distillers grains with solubles in lamb feedlot diets: carcass characteristics, adipose tissue fatty acid composition, and sensory panel traits.
  • *Seidel, D. S., T. R. Whitney, J. W. Walker, J. M. Musser, and T. R. Callaway. Alterations in caprine ruminal microorganism fermentation over time using camphor in vitro.
  • Brady, J. A., W. C. Stewart, T. R. Whitney, E. J. Scholljegerdes, C. J. Yeoman, R. P. Adams, D. L. Waldron, J. W. Walker, and J. M. B. Musser. Rumen microbial characteristics of goats selectively bred to have greater consumption of Juniperus pinchotii forage.
  • *Glasscock, J. L., T. R. Whitney, D. G. Hewitt, and S. M. Cooper. Use of ground juniper in white-tailed deer supplements.

 

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